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Im just a little bit dissapointed that he's not a fan, he says that he's a fan just because he works for them, he doesnt have any idea about FM? DBS? LOL

 

If a real hardcore fan works for LP we would get a lot of great things, imagine Astat or Hahninator working for them wow the fans would have a real connection with the band and as fans they know what we want and what are the main problems of the LPU (the site is boring as hell)

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Great job with the interview. I haven't finished the FM album either lol. Not my thing.

 

Poor Adam. Didn't realize how stressed he was during the scavenger hunt.

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Im just a little bit dissapointed that he's not a fan, he says that he's a fan just because he works for them, he doesnt have any idea about FM? DBS? LOL

 

If a real hardcore fan works for LP we would get a lot of great things, imagine Astat or Hahninator working for them wow the fans would have a real connection with the band and as fans they know what we want and what are the main problems of the LPU (the site is boring as hell)

I think the last thing they want is a fan working for them. They would get all giddy around them and might bug them with a bunch of questions. Adam is a class act. Stuck around on the forums and fansites during the bad days of LPU7 when everyone was complaining and bashing LP left and right. He came in and the LPU got that much better. Communication, contests (I even won one B)) you name it. Adam is great at what he does and is a perfect fit for this job.

Edited by Aiman

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Awesome interview. I still think that the LPU should let the fans choose what demos they want for at least one LPU CD someday, though. That'd be so epic.

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Awesome interview. I still think that the LPU should let the fans choose what demos they want for at least one LPU CD someday, though. That'd be so epic.

Do you think most LPUers have or at least know all of the demos that float on the Internet right now?

They might be requesting stuff that we already have, etc.

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Do you think most LPUers have or at least know all of the demos that float on the Internet right now?

They might be requesting stuff that we already have, etc.

Yes but then the LPU would know what has been released already, ruling out those. I can think of several demos right now that I would absolutely love to have but I know would never get released.

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That doesn't make any sense. They'd have to come up with a list we would pick from and not the other way around. A lot of stuff is just speculation. Also very difficult if you don't even know the name of a demo when there's just a short clip of it.

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Linkin Park frontman Chester Bennington credits thick skins, open minds and a strong friendship for breathing life into the band and keeping the creative juices flowing.

 

Almost 13 years after the release of their debut album, Hybrid Theory, the 36-year-old says being open to scrutiny from fellow band members has been the key to their creative success.

 

“We’re open to ideas, we want the sound to be successful and we want people to feel it,” Bennington says.

 

“All of us having that open mind pushes the songs forward in a productive way that gives them the chance to be good. If you’re so locked into your own idea that you can’t be open to the notion that it’s not very good or that we can maybe change these few lines you’re only doing yourself a disservice.”

 

He says the quality of songwriting, rather than egos, has always been the focus.

 

“The most important thing is always making sure that you’re staying open to criticism and open to the idea of making a track the best it can be or letting the track go because it’s not going to be up to par,” he says.

 

But Bennington says the similar work ethics are just icing on the cake of the solid friendships they’ve maintained by respecting each other’s individuality.

 

To read the full newspaper article go to:

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/entertain...a-1226574616725

Edited by CookieMonster

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Linkin Park have their own history with those clubs, and Mike Shinoda reflected on that recently with Rolling Stone. "More than three-quarters of our early shows were on Sunset at the Roxy and Whisky," he said. "I have such vivid memories of playing those shows, promoting those shows, walking around the street handing out fliers or posters or, at that point, giving people cassettes."

 

In the spirit of those days, the band went old-school to promote this show, which will see them top a bill that also includes Wale, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Asher Roth, Warren G., Slick Rick & Doug E. Fresh, the Last Internationale, Orgy and many more.

 

"I hand-drew four flyers and went down to Kinko's myself with Brad [Delson, guitarist] and Dave ["Phoenix" Farrell, bassist]," said Shinoda. "We photocopied them ourselves, cut them up, walked around Hollywood and on campus at UCLA and handed them out to people. We tweeted about it and got some funny reactions – people who thought we were some baby band trying to promote the show, and they were like, 'Oh yeah, man. You really should go down to the tattoo shop and hand out some flyers." Others were already diehard fans: "There were people who literally drove up from Anaheim and tracked us down just to say hello and grab a couple of flyers. They're handmade and hand-copied, and we only made a couple of hundred of them."

 

It all takes the band back to the very beginning, like their memorable first set at the Whisky. "Our very first show there we opened up for SX-10, with Sen Dog from Cypress Hill, and System of a Down," Shinoda recalled. "I remember really vividly that I had seen System play there before.

 

"It was the era where Incubus played there all the time, System played there quite a bit. And we played our set, which was probably 30 minutes at the time, and it was all friends. Nobody had even heard our music – they were there just to support friends."

 

After SX-10 performed, System of a Down's set was memorable for other reasons, he said. "It turned out that a couple of the guys had smoked weed with Sen backstage and got laid out. They were incapacitated. They were two hours late to start their set because some of them were just, like, unable to function." On the Strip? We'll have to take his word for it.

Full Interview

 

30 minutes Xero's set, thoughts?

Edited by Skipees

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Hm.

Xero Tape: 12:28

Esaúl and Slip: 6:30

Coal?: 3:30

= 22,28 min

feel free to add Pictureboard to your list ;)

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But we don't even know if they played that song. Same goes for Coal.

we don't know it about the rest of the songs too. i guess that in that time, they played live all (/almost) of their songs, since they didn't had a lot to choose from (as far as we know of course). Edited by Skipees

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since they didn't had a lot to choose from (as far as we know of course).

Yeah, Mike said a few years before that there aren't any Xero-era stuff except the tape, Esaúl and Pictrureboard. And then Coal came out of nowhere.......

And then Slip.

So I don't trust Mike and the band in these things anymore except Chester. <_<

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Yeah, Mike said a few years before that there aren't any Xero-era stuff except the tape, Esaúl and Pictrureboard. And then Coal came out of nowhere.......

And then Slip.

So I don't trust Mike and the band in these things anymore except Chester. <_>

but the Slip version we have is with Chester, so maybe Mark just wrote that but didn't record it. and Coal is instrumental. don't trust about what Mike said, but he's not far from the truth here (yet). Edited by Skipees

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Yeah, Mike said a few years before that there aren't any Xero-era stuff except the tape, Esaúl and Pictrureboard. And then Coal came out of nowhere.......

And then Slip.

So I don't trust Mike and the band in these things anymore except Chester. <_<

 

Contrary to popular belief, none of us actually know what we're talking about. FYI

;)

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but the Slip version we have is with Chester, so maybe Mark just wrote that but didn't record it. and Coal is instrumental. don't trust about what Mike said, but he's not far from the truth here (yet).

Chester sound very "Mark-ish" in Slip and in Esaúl. And different from the other demos from that era.

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Chester sound very "Mark-ish" in Slip and in Esaúl. And different from the other demos from that era.

because he's probably sing like Mark, with Mark lyrics. like his (Chester's) version of the demo tape.

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Hm.

Xero Tape: 12:28

Esaúl and Slip: 6:30

Coal?: 3:30

= 22,28 min

Don't forget there has to be some fan interaction.

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They would talk a lot while they were on stage back then.

*Not that they're not talking to fans on stage anymore, but they would do it more since they had less songs to perform ;)

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they would definitely take more time to talk back then, and I imagine that they would tune instruments in between songs (no guitar tech/fewer backup guitars). that would definitely fill up 30mins

 

they don't need to do that now :lol:

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on the other hand, back then the audience were their friends, how much they can talk with them? they already knew who they are, and knew the songs.

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on the other hand, back then the audience were their friends, how much they can talk with them? they already knew who they are, and knew the songs.

maybe, but you could also have a few casual fans - cheap shows back then, supports for other bands, depends on the kind of show Mike was talking about.

then again, look at our throwback broadcast - they were pretty quiet there too, all that way back.

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